15 posts categorized “Dr. Jason Peters”

March 19, 2014

Should We Smuggle?

A couple of weeks ago, I was asked to teach a missions class at a Christian university. The topic was “Smuggling” and it was an excellent opportunity for me to share our perspective on a controversial topic. One of the reasons that the topic of smuggling is so hotly debated in Christian circles is that many misunderstand a biblical hierarchy of authority.

One fact is clear: persecuted Christians are asking for Bibles. What will we do about it?

Should We Smuggle

Richard Wurmbrand wrote and spoke often about Bible smuggling.

VOM workers take risks to get God’s word into hostile and restricted nations. We are willing to work hard to get God’s Word to spiritually hungry people!

There are several explicit scriptural examples of breaking civil laws for God’s purposes. Here are a few quick examples that Richard Wurmbrand, our founder, alluded to: Michal put a doll in David’s bed to deceive Saul’s soldiers (An innocent man that had been anointed by God escaped), Rahab helped the spies smuggle themselves out of Jericho (Rahab is referred to as an example of faith in the NT), and Mary smuggled Jesus to Egypt (The law of Herod would have obliged Mary to give him up to death).

These examples are compelling and are worth digging into further. But, perhaps the most compelling examples emerge during the earliest days of the Church.

Two key verses report the apostles’ response to the command to stop spreading the good news about Jesus: “But Peter and John answered and said to them, “Whether it is right in the sight of God to listen to you more than to God, you judge. For we cannot but speak the things which we have seen and heard” (Acts 4:19–20).

But, wait, the case for illegal activity in the name of God becomes even more compelling when you flip the page in your Bible to Acts chapter 5. The local authorities, the High Priests, and the Sadducees were plagued with jealousy. So what did they do? They arrested the apostles and put them in the common prison. Consider verse 19: “But at night an angel of the Lord opened the prison doors and brought them out, and said, ‘Go, stand in the temple and speak to the people all the words of this life.’”

What? Are you saying that an “angel of the Lord” actually told Peter and the other apostles to break the law? Unbelievable!

Of course, a few verses later we see the response from Peter and the other apostles: “But Peter and the other apostles answered and said: “We ought to obey God rather than men” (Acts 5:29).

Wow! What a defining moment! Little did Peter and the other apostles know that their reaction to these threats would radically impact the history of the Church.

This would not be the last time that the apostles would suffer for Christ—they would face many more opportunities to suffer for His name’s sake. Are we willing to take that risk?

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in more than 30 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq, Nigeria and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.


February 20, 2014

Diocletian's Dream

“I found it necessary to write to you exhorting you to contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints” (Jude 3).

Hagia Sophia - web
I recently traveled to Turkey, where I was honored to meet with some incredible brothers who are “fighting the good fight” in a very difficult place. Turkey has long been a distinctive junction, bridging Europe and Asia in the historic city of Istanbul, which was sometimes historically referred to as “Islambol,” meaning “City of Islam.”

These brothers traveled to meet with me in the shadow of the Hagia Sophia, the former church that witnessed the slaughter of Christian martyrs after the fall of Constantinople.  As we talked about their own experience of persecution in their city, they lit up with joy as they related how God continues to work in the very city where Emperor Diocletian’s palace was discovered following an earthquake in 1999. The brothers I met with are actively overseeing an indigenous-led community of Christians that meets just steps away from this palace.

Why is this so remarkable? The Roman Emperor Diocletian instituted an empire-wide persecution of Christians soon after he assumed leadership in 284 A.D. During a period that is now referred to as the “Diocletianic Persecution,” or the “Great Persecution,” he launched the most aggressive and far-reaching attempt to destroy Christianity in Roman history. He specifically issued four edicts in an attempt to destroy Christianity. Diocletian’s first edict fiercely forbid Christians to assemble and ordered the destruction of Bibles and meeting places.

The day prior to Diocletian’s first edict, he demanded that the church at Nicomedia, where he spent his winters, be burned along with all of its Bibles. Diocletian’s dream was to wipe Christianity off of the face of the earth. But, of course, that is not the end of the story.

One of the Turkish brothers I met with is now pastoring a church literally feet away from Diocletian’s winter palace. After foreign missionaries were forced to leave, he stepped up and is leading a thriving congregation in the same neighborhood where martyr’s blood once stained the streets. He has been directly targeted by his adversaries, and he and his family have endured much suffering.

When I asked him about his suffering, he reflected thoughtfully on the persecution that he endured and said, with a smile, “It was not a pleasing experience, but it was a powerful experience.”

Join with me in praying for our brothers and sisters who are earnestly contending for the faith in Turkey, and let’s pray that God will enable us to stand strong wherever He has called us.

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in more than 30 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq, Nigeria and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.


January 22, 2014

Young Believers Killed in Peshawar

“Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of God. Assuredly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will by no means enter it.” (Mark 10:14b-15).

Sometimes children are able to see truth in unencumbered, refreshing ways. Jesus loved children, and even challenged his followers to “receive the kingdom of God as a little child.”

At VOM, we acknowledge the mandate of James 1:27 and have a unique interest in serving the underserved, especially children and widows living in areas that experience intense persecution. Pakistan is one of those places.

Pakistani Girls with The Story of Jesus (2)For several years, VOM has been in active partnership with David C. Cook, a nonprofit organization dedicated to publishing discipleship resources to help Christians all over the world grow in their faith.

Together, we have been able to distribute hundreds of thousands of “Story of Jesus” books in some of the world’s most difficult places. These colorful books, which are similar to “comic books,” introduce Jesus to children in a way that is very compelling. In fact, when I took a copy home to my own children, they were immediately drawn to it.

In July of 2013, two young girls in Pakistan received a copy of “the Story of Jesus” in their native language of Urdu. The Christians who distributed the booklets happily reported that these girls trusted Christ after reading these engaging booklets. Two more sisters were added to our family!

Just a couple of months later, on a sunny Sunday morning, two suicide bombers entered the All Saints Church compound in Peshawar, Pakistan. These Islamists waited until the services were over and the nearly 500 worshipers began to gather for a meal together. At 11:45, they detonated their suicide vests and killed 78 people and injured another 130. It was the deadliest attack on the Christian minority in the history of Pakistan.

In October, I received word that the two young sisters who received “the Story of Jesus” during the July distribution, and began to follow Jesus, were killed in the attack on that bright Sunday morning.

The death of children is especially tough, and many of the victims from Peshawar were women and children. There are never easy answers for difficult situations like this. They serve as vivid reminders of how fallen our world is. But, we do not mourn as those without hope! We believe that “while we are at home in the body we are absent from the Lord. For we walk by faith, not by sight” (2 Corinthians 5:6-7).

As you look at the photograph of these two young girls, please remember their families in prayer, along with the other families who lost loved ones in this attack. Pray also for those who plotted this attack. May God’s glory be manifested in all of the chaos that continues in this area. Finally, please pray with us that God will guide us as we do our best to minister in that difficult place.

Bio_jasonpetersDr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in more than 30 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq, Nigeria and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.


December 17, 2013

Modern Day Idols

“Bel bows down, Nebo stoops; their idols were on the beasts and on the cattle. Your carriages were heavily loaded, a burden to the weary beats. They stoop, they bow down together; they could not deliver the burden, but have themselves gone into captivity” (Isaiah 46:1-2).

Much of the world is still held captive by physical “idols.” These images, or objects, occupy a prominent place in modern worship for many world religions. Idols are often associated with pagan religions and are prominently featured in the worship practices of many Buddhists and Hindus.

The prophet Isaiah joined many other ancient prophets in pointing to the futility of idol worship. Isaiah noted that “beasts of burden” were used to transport these idols since they were unable to move themselves. He also indicated that the people who worshipped them had created complex systems of appeasement. In a bizarre irony, the worship of idols produced unnecessary, self-imposed captivity. Modern Day Idols

When I took the above photograph on a trip to visit brothers and sisters who live in a restricted nation in Asia, I was keenly aware of the contrast between the lavishness of the idol and the scarcity experienced in the village. The only way to navigate this part of the country is by boat. The villagers live on houses raised by stilts. On one end of their house, many wash their eating utensils in the open water. On the other end of the house, some have lavatories that empty into the same water.

The daily existence of these villagers depends on the fish they can catch, or the crops they can nurture in this flooded region. Theirs is a difficult life on several levels. Physically, they struggle to survive, wrestling with illness, disease, hunger and the lack of electricity.

They also struggle spiritually. Their prescribed “path” to God is one filled with rituals and sacrifice. Even a casual observer quickly makes out the dark hues of their obligatory bondage.

Strangely, in the midst of their deep poverty, they are surrounded by dozens of temples filled with riches. These temples display ornate decorations and spectacular golden statues, amid clouds of incense.

VOM is actively supporting believers who meet in a simple hut in this village. There are no golden statues and no ornate spectacles. In these modest gatherings, you will find simple, humble men and women reading Scripture, singing joyful hymns and praying for the strength to stand strong when they face the persecution delivered by their government and hostile neighbors.

May God help us remember these dear family members as they boldly counter their culture. May He also give us the grace to discern the ways that we are tempted to install “idols” in our lives.

Let us pray for the wisdom we need to worship the God who declared to Isaiah, “I am God, and there is no other; I am God, and there is none like Me, declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times things that are not yet done, saying, “My counsel shall stand, and I will do all My pleasure” (Isaiah 46:9-10).

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in more than 30 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.


November 27, 2013

Making Wigs in a Chinese Prison

“The Lord has done great things for us, And we are glad." (Psalm 126:3).

The tea shop was dark, but that was okay with us. In fact, we intended to find a place where we could meet secretly. The rendezvous had been arranged in a city that was a two-hour train ride from our contact's home, but meeting at our hotel was still too risky. Our national worker decided an empty, quiet tea room would be ideal.

We strategically selected an isolated table. As steaming drinks were brought to our table, we lowered our voices so that the server wouldn't hear any details. At one point, I cast a suspicious glance toward a cleaner who seemed to linger nearby.

Why all the precautions? I was in Western China meeting with a Christian leader who was imprisoned for three years because of his faith. While working in a labor camp, he was forced to make wigs. The quota was steep, and it was painstaking work. JP_China

Because my friend was older than the average prisoner, and had a reputation with the guards for being compassionate to others, he was asked to care for a young man who had frequent epileptic fits. The former drug addict he cared for soon decided to follow Jesus.

The former addict was later "promoted" and began overseeing quality control in the prison workshop. My friend said that they grew in friendship until they were "like Jonathan to David."

One day, a wig the older prisoner produced was inspected and failed the quality test. The younger man quickly exchanged the numbers and took the older man's punishment. My friend exclaimed, "I cried so much because it reminded me of Jesus!"

In the quiet tea room, my friend began to softly sing a hymn that encouraged him during his darkest hours. My teammate quickly grabbed his camera and discreetly recorded him singing. It is a recording I will treasure for a long time.

The old man came alive with joy when I asked him which Scripture passages had been especially meaningful during his darkest days. He lit up with excitement and started getting louder. Our translator told him he needed to quiet down or the entire tea shop was going to hear this sermon!

I asked him what he would tell me if he knew that I was going to be imprisoned tomorrow. He looked me right in the eye and said, "God is with you. God was with me and he will be with you."

May God guide each one of us as we stand with those who are suffering. God is with them in a very special, intimate way. And, as we lift them in prayer, God has given us the privilege of being his hands, feet and voices alongside them, no matter where we live.

Would you like to strengthen your prayers for your sisters and brothers in China?  Check out "Safely Home" by Randy Alcorn

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in more than 30 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.

Disclosure: The link to "Safely Home" above is an Amazon affiliate link. This means if you click on the link and purchase the book, VOM will receive a small affiliate commission on your purchase.


October 28, 2013

Cuban Fellowship

“I thank my God upon every remembrance of you, always in every prayer of mine making request for you all with joy, for your fellowship in the gospel from the first day until now, being confident of this very thing, that He who has begun a good work in you will complete it until the day of Jesus Christ” (Philippians 1:3-6).

Most of us have experienced the unique bonds that emerge when we share a meal with someone. It is a gift from God to be able to share this type of “fellowship” with another human.

Cuban Fellowship_JPI recently shared this type of communion with a dear family in Cuba. Their kitchen was rustic (see photo), but their hospitality was rich and warm. We began the meal by washing our hands with a bucket, because they did not have any running water. There was something distinctive about having to work together to wash our hands. As I stepped up to wash my hands, a friend gently poured water over my soapy hands. He was able to do what I could not. I was unable to complete this simple task without his help.

Then, we sat down to pray and dine together. The congri was warm, and the plantains were fresh, but they were both eclipsed by the richness of the joy we shared together. They had suffered much, but the Lord had been with them. And, now, as we reflected on their experiences, and the ways VOM had helped, they celebrated God’s care and provision for them.

Ellicott said, “It is a lovely thing when remembrance and gratitude are bound up together.”  Paul wrote that he prayed “with joy” every time he was reminded of his dear Philippian friends. Although they were over 800 miles away when Paul wrote this letter, the Philippian saints were still an active part of Paul's life and ministry. 

In Philippians 1:5, Paul used the word “koinonia” which simply means “fellowship.” There are at least two nuances to this word that we should think about. First, fellowship has the idea of “sharing together” in the sense of partnership. Ancient Greeks used it to describe business relationships. Secondly, it communicates “sharing with” in the sense of giving what we have to others. The Philippians were very giving people. They started giving early and didn’t give up!

Surprisingly, one of the best gifts we share with our sisters and brothers is simply letting them know that they are not alone. I remember talking with a Cuban leader and I’ll never forget what he said. He told me that as he heard about VOM and the way that we prayed for those who are persecuted around the world, he said, “I was so encouraged because I know I am not alone.”

The Philippian believers earned a special place in the heart of the Apostle Paul, and it wasn't because of anything spectacular they did, it was simply because they thoughtfully met his needs—they consistently put action behind their prayers. God will take our feeble attempts and turn them into masterpieces of love, for his glory!

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in more than 30 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.


September 18, 2013

UPDATE: Chased Into the Jungle

“Many sorrows shall be to the wicked; But he who trusts in the Lord, mercy shall surround him. Be glad in the Lord and rejoice, you righteous; And shout for joy, all you upright in heart” (Psalm 32:10, 11).

A few months ago, I shared the story of a strong ministry leader, Pastor Eduardo. One of his sons was recently killed by FARC guerrillas, and another son was chased into the jungle where he hid, all alone for four days.

Meanwhile, Eduardo and his wife believed that the FARC had killed their older son and kidnapped the younger one. They buried their older son two days later, while their younger son was still hiding in the jungle. He missed his own brother’s funeral. A couple of days later, after everything quieted down, the father went to look for the son and, by God’s grace, found him hiding in the jungle. Today they have moved to a new area, where VOM is supporting them as they plant a church there.

Showing prayer map to Pastor Eduardo
Showing prayer map to Pastor Eduardo
Just a few days ago, I was honored to meet with this dear family again. Our team drove for several hours, much of it on bumpy dirt roads, to visit their home and to encourage them face to face. 

This family has given up much for Jesus: one of their sons, their former home and their community, with the comfort, familiarity, friendships and family that so many of us take for granted.

In spite of all of their sacrifices, our visit was filled with joy! As I showed them VOM’s prayer map, they were encouraged to discover that they are not alone. Many of their sisters and brothers around the world join them in solidarity as they stand strong in the midst of persecution. They were also filled with joy because they were reminded that thousands of people have prayed for their family.

Then, with huge smiles on their faces, Eduardo and his wife shared that they are expecting another child! Gloria a Dios! The pain of losing their son has not disappeared, and there were tear-filled eyes around the room as we talked about him. But, these eyes were also lit up with excitement! They rejoice because they are experiencing the indescribable mercy of God in the midst of their struggle.

As we prepared to leave, Pastor Eduardo stood on the roof of his house and pointed with excitement to a part of town where he hopes to see his growing church expand their outreach into the community.

Please remember Eduardo, his wife, their 5 sons, and their unborn child in your prayers as they continue to stand strong. May God help all of us to faithfully follow him, despite the difficulties and opposition we encounter.

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in more than 30 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted
church.


August 27, 2013

Mightier than the Roaring Waves

“The Lord on high is mightier than the noise of many waters, than the mighty waves of the sea.” (Psalms 93:4).

Mindinao_Children
A few weeks ago I was in Mindanao, the second largest and southernmost island in the Philippines. There is a significant Muslim presence in this region and conflict between the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and Christians has raged for several decades.

On February 20th of this year, Pastor Rey Debardo, 44, his wife, Renaly and two of their daughters, Catherine Faith and Karen, were shot with an M-16 rifle and a .45 caliber pistol.  The police recovered 156 shells from the area. Their 16 year old daughter survived the attack and is in a safe place now. When reporters asked her how she felt about the people who killed her family, she said, "I must trust the Lord to change them." Mindanao is a very demanding place to serve, but these sisters and brothers are experiencing God’s grace in remarkable ways.

While in Mindanao, I met with dozens of Christians who live and minister in these difficult areas. One of them, Pastor Noel, leads about 80 people in prayer at 4:30 a.m., 7 days a week. He smiled as he told me, "We work, not in an offensive mode, but in an advancing mode."

One day while another group of believers were at an early morning meeting, Muslims attacked their village. They quickly ran outside, grabbed a little boat and dragged it to the seashore. When they arrived at the beach, they saw several Muslims unloading heavy weaponry onto the beach. The church members quietly boarded their boat and began to paddle away. Even though the boat was designed for three people, they were able to fit 12 people inside. The pastor shared that, for their little boat, the sea was calm that morning—miraculously calm—and they made it to safety. Later, they discovered that, sadly, seven other boats sank that morning during attempts to escape.

The overarching theme of our meetings was that these Christians are “overcomers.” They are not able to overcome in their own strength, but they are secure in our Master's will. They are overcomers because they are learning to love to focus less on the “here and now” and more on the “then and there.” We learn a lot from their example. Please pray God will enable each one of us to live with an “eternal perspective”, by His grace, and for His glory!

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in 28 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.


July 12, 2013

Kingdom Industriousness

“Do you see a man who excels in his work? He will stand before kings; He will not stand before unknown men” (Proverbs 22:29).

Industriousness_blog

An overarching characteristic of believers I meet around the world is their industriousness. A person who is “industrious” may be described as someone “energetically devoted to a task.” As a father, I am thrilled when I see my teenage children demonstrate industriousness. While some of their peers are lounging around for the summer, a couple of my children are busy mowing lawns, dog-sitting and volunteering at our church.

Ministry as a “profession” is a luxury most of the sisters and brothers we serve will never experience. Instead, they diligently serve God where he has planted them—usually managing a full-time job and a demanding ministry to those around them.   

For example, I remember a strong brother, Bijay, who operated a medical kiosk in South Asia. His “profession” was similar to that of a pharmacist, but his “calling” was to be an evangelist. The transforming message he shared generated so much conflict in his neighborhood that angry opponents eventually destroyed his shop.

VOM’s indigenous leader for the area heard about the attack and decided to help. When I stopped by to visit a few months later, Bijay was operating a new medical shop just a few villages down the road from the village he was attacked in. He uses his new location to carry on with his practice and to continue fulfilling his calling as an evangelist.  

One of the fruitful ways VOM is able to serve these “industrious” believers is by providing vocational training that they are able to integrate with their ministry. In dozens of countries, VOM is helping Christians learn a new trade. In one case, we provided sewing machines and training for a group of young women. These sisters were abandoned by their husbands, or their parents, and sometimes evicted from their villages because of their faith in Christ, but they are pressing on in faith and hope!

As an added benefit, these young ladies experience a new sisterhood as they train together. As they learn their new trade, in relative safety now, they also share life. They live, work and play together and develop deep personal bonds as they grow.

When their course is complete, they open small sewing shops and serve their communities. Imagine the opportunities they have as they build relationships with customers and deliver high-quality products. Only Heaven will reveal how meaningful these vocational training programs are—in the lives of these sisters and in the lives of those they will impact.

It is our honor to help facilitate their spiritual and vocational development. And, on their behalf, I’d like to say “Thank you” for praying for them. Isn’t it exciting to consider that your prayers today will be felt around the world by the “industrious” believers that we are able to equip?

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in 28 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.


June 17, 2013

Angelic Interventions

“Let brotherly love continue. Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by so doing some have unwittingly entertained angels (Hebrews 13:1-2).”

There have been several dramatic interviews with persecuted Christians which I will never forget. During one interview I learned about an Indonesian evangelist who encountered several boys in a remote area after he ran out of gas. The boys eagerly pushed his disabled vehicle to a gas station while singing a Christian hymn and then abruptly disappeared—leaving him wondering whether they were angelic helpers!

VN_Motorcycles
Motorbikes like these are common in Vietnam.

Another remarkable Vietnamese evangelist shared excitedly about God’s specific and dramatic intervention in his ministry work. Vietnam is one of the restricted nations VOM has been working in for many years. In spite of intense restrictions, we are honored to hear miraculous accounts of God guiding His people as they faithfully follow him there.

I interviewed a leader from Vietnam recently who told me an amazing story about boldly traveling into an area that he was not authorized to be in. Every step he took was bathed in prayer as he encountered various checkpoints and obstacles, knowing that he was risking imprisonment for talking about Jesus in this difficult region.

As he prayed on the side of the road, asking God for wisdom about his next step, he was surprised when a man stopped his motorbike and asked him if he needed a ride. He gratefully accepted the man’s offer. Just a few minutes later he was shocked, and more than a little bit worried, when the man drove directly to the local police station. The driver ordered him to wait outside. As the evangelist waited for the next 10 minutes, he prayed and wondered what to do—even though I am sure it felt much longer than 10 minutes at the time!

The evangelist believed God was leading him to patiently wait, and a few minutes later the driver of the motorbike emerged from the police station wearing a police uniform with insignia reflecting an influential rank on his shoulder. He hopped back on the motorbike and the police officer and his nervous passenger eased through several checkpoints with a salute and a wave. They were never even asked for identification!

The police officer eventually dropped the evangelist off near his destination and left. Following this bizarre incident, the evangelist decided that God was asking him to follow up and to try to locate the driver. When it was safer, he returned to the same police station and inquired about the driver. As he described the man, his motorbike and his rank, the local police had no idea who he was talking about—the man simply did not exist!

This Vietnamese evangelist is convinced that he was delivered by an angel on a motorbike—and it’s not the first time he’s experienced angelic intervention!

May God guide us as we faithfully follow him with our eyes open to see and our hearts willing to welcome these types of angelic encounters in our own lives.

YOUR TURN: Have you had what you believe to be angelic encounters in your own ministry or life? Share your story in the comments to this post.

Dr. Jason Peters serves in VOM’s International Ministries department, traveling frequently to meet with our persecuted brothers and sisters around the world. He lived overseas for five years and has ministered in 28 countries as diverse as Cuba, Nepal, Iraq and Indonesia. He and his wife, Kimberly, along with their five children, count it a great honor to serve with the persecuted church.